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A taste of natural heritage and history in a small country town 

White Spider Orchids (Caladenia longicauda) in the Ongerup area. (EmaLea Davidson)

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Ongerup may be on the smaller side of regional towns, but don’t let that fool you into thinking it shouldn’t be on your spring radar.

While there are many, if you needed just one reason to visit, the annual Wildflower Display held in the Ongerup & Needilup District Museum would be it. 

Wildflowers unique to the area on display

The museum itself is worth the trip with it’s rich history as a railway barracks and the styled rooms reflecting an early settlers’ lifestyle, but the real star of the show is the meticulously collected and displayed wildflowers. 

“It showcases Ongerup area wildflowers unique to this area,” said Sandy Vaux, president of the Ongerup Community Resource Centre Committee. 

“[It’s] a taste of natural heritage and history in a well kept museum in a small community so makes a great stop along the way.”

The show origins trace back to well-known local botanist Ken Newbey, who helped start the Show around 40 years ago. 

In honour of his contribution, the organisers spend time ensuring the specimens are botanically named. 

Ms Vaux said this is one of the most important aspects of the display for her.

“[The Show has] botanically named local area wildflowers which maybe some don’t grow anywhere else.”

“[The Show has] botanically named local area wildflowers which maybe some don’t grow anywhere else

“[It helps to] create an awareness of the natural environment.” 

The Ongerup & Needilup District Museum (Humanitix)

Aboriginal food display, native garden beds and more 

The first thing you notice entering the Show is the smell of spring, and the elated feeling that you’re somewhere special will travel with you throughout the display. 

Alongside the blooms, visitors will also be treated to an Aboriginal foods display in the old farm house, natural heritage items, native garden beds,  and the museum buildings opened for viewing including the original railways barracks. 

There is also a large shed with a heritage shearing and machinery display for hard work enthusiasts. 

“[The Show is for] local and regional visitors, anyone who is interested in wildflowers and seeing small town attractions as well,” said Ms Vaux.

Visitors to the town can also get involved if they have a picker’s licence and the ability to collect specimens on private properties or verges, plus the Wildflower Show itself could use a couple of extra hands on board. 

“We have some local volunteers but always need help from anyone else with a knowledge of wildflowers and local history and enjoy talking to visitors.”

“We have some local volunteers but always need help from anyone else with a knowledge of wildflowers and local history and enjoy talking to visitors,” said Ms Vaux.

Starting from 9am on Monday 20th of September, the wildflowers will be on display until 4pm Sunday 3rd of October as part of the LiveLighter Bloom Festival.

Read more like this:

BOM winter report sees Ongerup record it’s wettest winter since 1978

Ongerup OAM’s return

Five Great Southern community groups receive portion of $150,000 grant

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