Breaksea Art Trail unveils the stories of Great Southern artists

Portrait of visual artist Nikki Green (Nic Duncan )

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Local arts organisation Breaksea has launched its latest interactive art and film project across Albany venues.

Breaksea aims to promote the benefits of creativity and participation within the arts by engaging the community in its latest projects.

The Breaksea Film Art Trail consists of seven eye catching photographic portraits and corresponding films spread out across Albany CBD venues.

Sneak peak behind the artistic process 

Each of the portraits, shot by Nic Duncan and Luke Hetherington, has a QR code linking to a short film that dives behind the scenes of the artwork and artist. 

Breaksea artist Pia Harris said they were looking for ways to engage the community with local artists in a new and innovative way.

“These films are all about Great Southern artists,” she said.

 “It’s about raising awareness for some very successful artists from the region that people might not necessarily know about and giving them a platform to be heard and see.

“The trial is also about raising awareness for Breaksea to say we are around, we are here to connect with you.”

Portraits around town 

The eye-catching portraits can be spotted at venues such as the Lavender Cottage, Six Degrees and the Albany Town Hall.

Denmark Award-winning Denmark filmmakers Rob Castiglione and John Carberry created the films.

Castiglione’s film Ture Portraits follows photographer Nic Duncan along her artist’s process in creating the portrait of visual artist Nikki Green.

“I always carried a camera with me, it was all I could think about and all I wanted to do and it hasn’t gone away at all,” Duncan said.

“Without it I don’t know who I would be.

“If I have a camera in my hand, I’m happy.”

Real stories behind local artists 

The short films capture a rare and raw insight into the personal and artistic development of Great Southern creatives.

When viewers scan the QR code the story from behind the artwork is revealed.

“We really encourage people to physically do the trial, it’s really fun and doesn’t take that long,” Harris said.

“They’re really great films, they’re really intimate and very honest and they are important stories to be told.”

READ MORE HERE:

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