Community clash 

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Last Thursday, the clash of world views between the LGBTQ and Christian communities displayed the seriousness of what looms ahead.

At the Albany Baptist Church, seven women and men spoke of their personal, tragic stories transitioning from lesbian, gay and transgender lifestyles to one of faith in Jesus Christ.

The help they received was simply from kind people who listened, prayed and offered support.

The crux of the clash is this: for a long time the LGBTQ communities have sought to be accepted by the wider community, understandably saying they should not be discriminated against because of their sexuality.

Whereas the Christian communities have historically claimed that sex should only be between a man and women, and this within marriage alone (fundamentally, I believe, because sex produces children).
This clash is coming to a head with legal powers (such as in Victoria) moving in on churches, schools and even families making it is illegal to voice or promote the traditional Christian view of sex on others, even hindering those within the LGBTQ communities seeking help to leave their lifestyles. 

If you think this will not affect families, think again.

Many Christians in Australia seeking to help in the foster care field have been denied or hindered because of their traditional beliefs on sexuality.

And there is the case of Robert Hoogland, a Canadian who was denied access to his teenage biological daughter for opposing her trans gendering, refusing to call her him and then jailed for five years because he went public about it.  

One of the speakers at the Albany Baptist church, a former transgender, said he wished someone had told him not to transgender, even though he wouldn’t have liked it, but nobody did.

The theme repeatedly expressed by the seven former LGBTQ men and women was that the help they sought and received should not be banned by government powers.

Such a legal position would leave many seeking help in despair.
There will always be a clash of worldviews and neither the LGBTQ or the church communities should regard each other as enemies, but there is an enemy looming and this is governmental powers that will criminalise or shut down one of the voices, leaving many seeking help powerless. 

Martyn Mettam, Albany

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