‘Falling over and failing to warn drivers’: why the State Government is conducting a review of regional roadwork signs 

The Regional Roadworks Signage Review team are coming to Albany.  (Photo: Isabel Vieira)

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Albany residents are being invited to provide feedback on how regional roadwork signs can be improved.

Transport Minister Rita Saffioti ordered an independent review into the issue last November following community concerns temporary road signs frequently fell over and failed to warn drivers of hazards.

The aim of the review is to conduct a state-wide investigation into how roadwork signs can be improved in order to make regional roads safer for both drivers and road workers.

Regional Roadworks Signage Review Chairperson Dennis O’Reilly will oversee the assessment alongside industry representatives from the Traffic Management Association WA, Livestock and Rural Transporters’ Association, WorkSafe and WA Police. 

Listening to locals 

The review team will be heading to Albany on May 24 to hold a community information session at Centennial Stadium to hear what locals have to say about roadwork signage. 

“We are keen to understand what the community thinks is done well and what they think could be improved in relation to temporary roadworks signage throughout regional Western Australia,” Mr O’Reilly said.

“We also want to know what people find difficult about temporary road works signage, which might include visibility, position, glare, signs being knocked over and the use of technology, such as digital signage and temporary traffic signals.”

Multifaceted review 

The Australian Road Research Board (ARRB) will undertake the technical and research aspect of the review, with their findings to be considered alongside feedback from stakeholders and community members.

“The independent, expert advice offered by ARRB will provide valuable insight into ensuring temporary signage remains secure and does its job of warning and advising road users to ensure their safety,” Ms Saffioti said.

The review team will be travelling to 14 regional towns including Esperance, Kalgoorlie and Karratha as part of the state-wide consultation process. 

The Albany information session will run from 5-7pm at Centennial Stadium on May 24, or residents can fill out the online survey at https://www.mysaytransport.wa.gov.au/regional-roadworks-signage-review?tool=survey_tool#tool_tab

 

 

 

 

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