Land owners say roos wrecking pastures after being displaced by Ring Road 

The (Photo: Michael Roberts )

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A group of kangaroos displaced by the Albany Ring Road are reportedly causing havoc for surrounding landowners.

A large number of roos lost their home west of Albany Highway in McKail when construction workers tore up land for one of the biggest infrastructure projects ever undertaken in the Great Southern.

When the $175 million Ring Road is finished, it will run parallel along the eastern side of Link Road down towards South Coast Highway before it connects with Lower Denmark Road and heads east towards Albany Port.

But property owners between Albany Highway and Link Road are growing frustrated by a group of about 200 kangaroos that have migrated to their property after construction works began.

One farmer, who asked to remain anonymous, said the natives were chewing through their paddocks.

They said hay production had fallen by about 50 per cent after the roos were hunted onto adjoining farmland.

“Main Roads should pay for them eating the pasture,” they said.

The farmer said the kangaroos were getting stuck in fences trying to get back to their homeland and could simply slip under fences put up by Main Roads to move between areas.

Main Roads said its strategy did not extend to forcible herding or containment of kangaroos in an alternative location.

Main Roads says its management strategy is working 

Responding to questions from the Weekender, Main Roads said the kangaroo population west of Albany Highway was a “long-term structural issue, pre-dating the Albany Ring Road project.”

“The solution to this matter sits outside of Main Roads’ remit,” Main Roads spokesperson Dean Roberts said.

“There is little evidence of any significant impact to neighbouring landowners as a direct result of kangaroo migration from the site.”

Mr Roberts said Main Roads and contractor Decmil had successfully reduced kangaroo numbers on the Albany Ring Road site to a “manageable number”.

“Main Roads’ selected strategy for moving kangaroos on from the construction area was to remove fauna attractants such as food and water from the site, and to shepherd the kangaroos up and out of the work area progressively; to new areas, where food, water and shelter was available,” he said.

“This strategy did not extend to forcible herding or containment of kangaroos in an alternative location.

“This is because the technique is known to cause distress to the animals and has a very low success rate as kangaroos are known to move around in response to the environmental conditions.”

Designed to provide an alternative route for freight vehicles travelling to and from Albany Port, the Ring Road is expected to be completed by early 2024.

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