Protestors spend the night in the trees

Nelson Gilmour at a protest against the lime pit last year.  (Isabel Vieira)

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Environmental protesters have taken their efforts to save a possum habitat to new heights by spending the night in a tree on the Nullaki Peninsula.

Nelson Gilmour, former Seat of Albany Greens Candidate, spent Tuesday night huddled on a 20-metre-high platform suspended in the tree canopy of a 200-year-old Karri.

Another protestor spent the winter night in a hammock, while other members of the Nullaki Community Action Group rallied from the road.

The group were protesting Denmark property developer Graeme Robertson’s lime pit development on the Nullaki Peninsular, which was originally voted down by the Albany Council twice before receiving the go ahead by the State Administrative Tribunal in 2019.

Over 100 Karri and Marri trees have been marked to be cleared to allow for an access road to a lime pit to be widened.

Mr Gilmore said they didn’t want the lime pit to go ahead in the first place.  

“A beautiful and incredibly diverse wetland has been cleared further down the road from us so that they can access the lime,” he said. 

“They have destroyed habitat for critically endangered Western Ringtail Possums.

“At the very least we want to prevent the 100 or so old trees, and all the habitat they provide, along Lake Saide Road from being destroyed as well.”

Mr Robertson had allegedly proposed to realign the access road to the lime pit in order to spare a number of the trees from being removed.

“We want Graeme Robertson to stop clearing and talk to the City of Albany about realigning the road to avoid any further trees being cut down or cleared,” Mr Gilmour said.  

“The community is increasingly frustrated by the profound failure of process here and we will not be going quietly.”

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