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Nannas fighting for the Great Southern’s native forests

Nannas for Native Forests (Deanna Corrieri)

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There is a power to what a group of nannas can do.

From hand stitching fabric leaves over cups of tea, to raising awareness and actively fighting for the protection of native forests, the Denmark Nannas for Native Forests are more than what they seem.

The native forests of the Great Southern and South-West regions are imperative for the future of humanity and the Nannas are doing all they can to save what is left for future generations.

The Nannas are striving to stop the logging of native bushland by lobbying with the Government and to change in the way old growth forests are protected.

Nanna Theda Mansholt said their passion came from protecting biodiversity and ensuring future generations had native forests to explore.

“We’re feeling quite frustrated and angry with our government that logging is still going on at ten football fields a day,” she said.

“We just want to do anything we can to stop the logging.”

“We just want to do anything we can to stop the logging.”

The lengths Nannas go to

Education is a key pillar for the Denmark Nannas, who said there was a lack of education to the public who were unaware of how little is left of native forests, and the threat of climate change on those forests.

Nanna Julie Marsh said forests are part of our necessity for human existence.

“Forests are life, we need forest to breathe, so that’s becoming quite a respective issue in regard to climate change,” she said.

“We want to raise people’s awareness about what’s happening in the forests.”

“We want to raise people’s awareness about what’s happening in the forests.

“We have this opportunity to save this gem, not just for us but for the globe.”

 But some days, the Nannas face tough decisions and witness severe logging of native bushland when conducting citizens’ inspections.

“We go out and do citizens’ inspections of these places to firsthand witness what’s actually happening to our forests and what’s happening to the timber,” Ms Marsh said.

“That doesn’t always match up to what the community is being told.”

Ms Marsh said the community “felt disempowered” by the rhetoric of economics. “Economics top everything in our world, which is frightening for our children and grandchildren, so nannas are stepping up,” she said.

Nanna Jill Rule said they hoped to save the regions forests for future generations to explore and thrive in.

“We want forests to be there for next generations, for our grandchildren,” she said.

At home amongst nature

Ms Marsh said every leaf they sewed over a cup of tea was a symbol of their resilience and continued effort to save the regions native forests, but the fight to save the forests was far from over.                                                                                                                                                                                                                    

“I know in my heart I want to live in nature,” Nanna Gina Blieberger said.

“I want to be part of nature, I want to be able to talk to trees and look at beautiful flowers.”

“I want to be part of nature, I want to be able to talk to trees and look at beautiful flowers.

“It is for a human being to be part of the natural world and we have an obligation to preserve that.”  

Nannas for Native Forests (Deanna Corrieri)

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