Uncovering espionage – Australian spy secrets revealed at Museum of Great Southern exhibition 

A USA spy coding machines.  (Supplied: )

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Museum of the Great Southern is hosting an exhibition to expose the undercover life of spies in Australia.

Spy: Espionage in Australia is a collection of authentic spy gadgets and equipment taken from the National Archives of Australia. 

Running from May 8 until July 25, the exhibition will unveil the personal experiences of Australian secret agents and delve into the history of espionage and counter-espionage throughout the years.

On display for all to see will be spy equipment and surveillance images from the Australian Security and Intelligence Organisation, alongside candid interviews with officers.

The Western Australian Museum partnered with the National Archives in order to host the exhibition at regional museums across the state.

WA Museum CEO Alec Coles said it was a rare opportunity for people to hear the stories of real life spies.

“There can be few subjects that fire our imagination more than this,” she said.

“This is an opportunity to get an insight into the very secret world of spies.”

Copy of War and Peace used to conceal a small camera. (Supplied: Australian Security Intelligence Organisation)

The exhibition will feature hands-on activities such as playing the part of a secret agent in an interactive trail, testing your skills at codebreaking and reading invisible ink.

National Archives Director General David Fricker said visitors of all-ages will have the opportunity to get involved with the interactive exhibition.

“International spies have appeared in popular culture for decades, but our own country’s history of espionage is something that would be unfamiliar to many people,” he said.

“In this exhibition you’ll find everything from quirky spy gadgets to serious historical stories.

“We were able to draw extensively from the National Archives’ collection and collaborate with security organisations that are normally out of the public view.

“We look forward to sharing this exhibition with the Great Southern region of WA, as it tours around the country.”

 

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